TORONTO, APRIL 23RD, 2019 – Youth Fusion announced a three-year agreement with the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) to provide full-year experiential learning programs to its secondary school students through the Video Game Creation Program. Developed in partnership with video game industry leader Ubisoft, students will learn how to design, develop, and market their own video game through the program.

“Over 23 Million Canadians play video games. For younger players, they are a way to learn, explore, and connect with friends,” [1] said Rima Brek, Associate Managing Director, Ubisoft Toronto. “We are proud to partner with Youth Fusion on this innovative program that provides students with the opportunity to develop increasingly valuable STEAM-focused skills needed for the jobs of the future, by learning how to make their own video game.”

Youth Fusion will bring their full-year programming to the TDSB in September 2019, integrating 21st century skills development, applicable to their Information Communications Technology Specialist High Skills Major certification. Through the program, youth have the opportunity to develop job-ready skill sets applicable to the technology industry through mentorship from university students and expert developers at Ubisoft Toronto, Ontario’s largest game development studio.

Experiential learning at its optimum, where art and creativity marry programming,” says Principal Sam Miceli of George Harvey Collegiate Institute, “our pupils are psyched!”

Fast Facts

  • Youth Fusion introduced the Video Game Creation Program as a pilot in Quebec schools in 2014
  • Since then over 25 schools in Quebec and Ontario have taken part in the program
  • 65 TDSB students from George Harvey Collegiate Institute and Kipling Collegiate Institute participated in a four-month pilot project of the program in 2018-2019
  • Across its history, over 500 marginalized youth have been positively impacted by the program

 

About Youth Fusion

Youth Fusion is an award-winning charity that contributes to the persistence in school, employability and civic engagement of youth by developing innovative experiential learning projects that create ongoing links between school systems and the community. Every week, we work with 15,000 young people in over 250 schools in rural, urban and Indigenous communities.

[1] http://theesa.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/ESAC18_BookletEN.pdf